≡ Menu

Books

The book that’s a godsend for anyone trying to work out how to live off their money in retirement.

{ 100 comments }

John Lee’s book on stock picking won’t tell you exactly how to find treasure in the UK stock market, but it is a great exposition of why it’s worth trying.

{ 6 comments }

How does the 3rd edition of Smarter Investing by Tim Hale change the game for passive investors? And are there overlooked lessons from the 1st edition?

{ 31 comments }

Tim Hale’s Smarter Investing is The Accumulator’s go-to book. It’s now on its third edition.

{ 27 comments }

Slowly but surely, eBooks are taking over from their papery predecessors. Here’s a few Kindle books about money and investing to get you started.

{ 19 comments }

Michael Lewis’ compelling expose of the runaway Wall Street machine that caused the credit crunch is both horrifying and fascinating.

{ 6 comments }

Mike Piper’s latest book, Investing Made Simple, is available as a PDF, for free, until October 2009. Here’s how to get it.

{ 5 comments }

Oblivious Investing

Oblivious Investing is a must read for novice investors, making a powerful but easy-to-follow case for passive investing in barely 100 pages.

{ 6 comments }

More happens to Richard Branson in Losing My Virginity in a page than happens to Theo Paphitis in whole chapters of Enter The Dragon.

{ 2 comments }

I have just finished the The Snowball, the first biography Warren Buffett has cooperated with. It’s full of surprises, such as how Buffett had three leading ladies for two decades, and how his 1960s home was an accidental outpost of the counterculture. But I’m more interested in how Buffett made his money. And while there’s [...]

{ 17 comments }

You know Duncan Bannatyne. Okay, not the name perhaps, but you know the man. The accent. Come on, you remember – the scary one on BBC2’s Dragon’s Den? The bloke who sounds moments away from thumping the next entrant who wants £100,000 for a 10% stake in their snake charming business? The great triumph of [...]

{ 2 comments }

The Rules of Wealth

“Do as I do, not as I say” is a useful maxim in life. It’s one instinctively understood by children (“But daddy, you ate three packets of crisps and YOU never clean YOUR room – it’s unfair!”) and politicians (“But you, Snouty and Fatcat already have knighthoods – it’s unfair!”). But can mimicking the wealthy [...]

{ 0 comments }

Richard Farleigh has made a lot of money via the markets – tens of millions, maybe hundreds. This book doesn’t give a precise number, though we do learn that the Australian investor’s first ambition was to be a bushranger like Ned Kelly. (Think highwayman Dick Turpin with a bucket on his head. Not so far [...]

{ 0 comments }

The Armchair Economist

Don’t smirk: Settling down with a good book on investment can be oddly soothing. As the light dawns over your financial blackspots, panic is replaced by calm. Before long you’re scanning the Financial Times with aplomb, and even reading the small print. (Well, not all the time: I’m currently enjoying Harry Potter and the Deathly [...]

{ 0 comments }