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Weekend reading: May be not

Weekend reading: May be not post image

I have lived happily under Conservative and Labour governments. But I’m glad voters pushed back against the growing appetite in some quarters for an authoritarian one.

Well done Britain.

Dare I hope for more than a recognition that we live in a multi-party democracy?

One Financial Times writer thinks so [Search result]:

The election throws up an even larger prize: a more moderate version of EU exit than the one envisaged by Mrs May.

Before pro-Europeans become delirious, Friday’s result cannot be interpreted as an equal and opposite reaction to the Europe referendum. The two main party manifestos did not differ much on the subject.

But the prime minister called this election to secure a mandate for her hard take on exit and failed to obtain it. Most of her plausible successors – Philip Hammond, the chancellor of the exchequer, and Amber Rudd, the home secretary, who might take on Mr Johnson – are pragmatists.

They will also see where the Tories lost seats: cities, university towns. The bits of Britain that are at ease with the outside world.

We’ll see.

(We all know politics can get tetchy, so please everyone try to keep it civil and constructive if you want to comment. Thanks!)

What caught my eye this week.

From Monevator

Family Income Benefit: The forgotten policy – Monevator

Getting older? Admit it when you rebalance your portfolio – Monevator

From the archive-ator: Talking about money is like French kissing – Monevator

News

Note: Some links are Google search results – in PC/desktop view these enable you to click through to read the piece without being a paid subscriber.1

Average UK rents fall for the first time in more than seven years – Guardian

House prices set to keep beating wages, with RICS predicting 3.5% annual growth – ThisIsMoney

The heartening story of an everyday 98-year old who retired at 45 – Chicago Tribune

Insurance Premium Tax increase to 12% to push up motoring premiums [Search result]FT

Products and services

First ever Lifetime ISA from Skipton pays just 0.5% – ThisIsMoney

Digital coins are making Bitcoin’s rip-roaring rally appear tame – Bloomberg

Atom Bank delays its digital-only current account on threat of new regulation – ThisIsMoney

Seedrs has launched the Beta version of its secondary market: ‘Trading Tuesdays’ – Seedrs

Comment and opinion

Thinking through a change in asset allocation – A Wealth of Common Sense

Confessions of a newly-minted gold bug – 3652 Days

What happens to bonds in a stock market crash? – Oblivious Investor

Small and value data for a big world – Portfolio Charts

A tale of two markets: Politics and investing – Musings on Markets

History lesson: Four unsung heroes of investment – Bps and Pieces

The financial pain equation – Tony Isola

David Stevenson: I got married for tax reasons [Search result]FT

The easy way to buy quality companies at the right price – Richard Beddard

If this guy can cycle to work then you can probably cycle to work – Mr Money Mustache

Emerging markets are not all created equal [Curious if flawed chart]The Big Picture

The state pension: Is it sustainable? – DIY Investor (UK)

General Election 2017

The results – Guardian

Was this the revenge of the Liberal Metropolitan elite? – Telegraph

How did Theresa May’s gamble fail? [Nice graphics]Guardian

Theresa May’s failed gamble [Search result]Economist

George Osborne savages May in four editions of the Evening StandardTelegraph

“Yet another own goal”: EU braces for Brexit talks delay – Guardian

9 key questions for your personal finances – Telegraph

Post-election thoughts, and an encounter with an aristocratic Brexiteer – S.L.I.S.

If a ‘soft Brexit’ is back on the table, remind me of the options again? – Telegraph

The views of some professional investors – Telegraph

Liam Young isn’t pleased about the Tory’s bedfellows – Twitter

Off the investing beat

Experience is overrated – The Irrelevant Investor

Advice for new college graduates – Financial Samurai

Bill Gates and Warren Buffett spend a day mattress testing [Video]YouTube

Entropy: Why life always seems to get more complicated – James Clear

Ich bin ein f-cking Millwall now – Telegraph

And finally…

“But if cities are indeed some sort of superorganism, then why do almost none of them ever die? There are, of course, classic examples of cities that have died, especially ancient ones, but they tend to be special cases due to conflict and the abuse of the immediate environment. Overall they represent only a tiny fraction of all those that have ever existed. Cities are remarkably resilient and the vast majority persist. Just think of the awful experiment that was done seventy years ago when atom bombs were dropped on two cities, yet just thirty years later they were thriving. It’s extremely difficult to kill a city!”
– Geoffrey West, Scale: The Universal Laws of Life and Death in Organisms, Cities, and Companies

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{ 52 comments… add one and remember nothing here is personal advice }
  • 51 The Investor June 13, 2017, 8:28 am

    It’s called democracy, get over it or go live in North Korea.

    Yes, that’s exactly the spirit that gave us democracy and preserves it.

  • 52 Steve June 13, 2017, 6:12 pm

    Surely there has to be a fix coming down the track, along the lines of going into the EEA and forgetting this nonsense of controlling “freedom of movement”; I say nonsense because as I understand it the same foreign workers will be here as before and more will come, because needed, in the future. So what are we doing this for? To regain “sovereignty”? I was not aware tanks were on our beaches. To trade with distant places? Why do that at the expense of trading on our own doorstep? Lastly, who can possibly think that our leaders should even try to obey the wishes of the least bright half of our population? That is, almost by definition, a road to hell.

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